Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Oct;100(10):3633-40. doi: 10.1210/jc.2015-2696. Epub 2015 Aug 27.

Use of Antibiotics and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

Author information

1
Center for Diabetes Research (K.H.M., F.K.K.), Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup; Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research (K.H.M., F.K.K.), Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Medicine (M.F.), Kolding Hospital, Kolding, Denmark; Endocrine Research Unit (M.F.), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; and Clinical Pharmacology (J.H., A.P.), Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Abstract

CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE:

Evidence that bacteria in the human gut may influence nutrient metabolism is accumulating. We investigated whether use of antibiotics influences the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and whether the effect can be attributed to specific types of antibiotics.

METHODS:

We conducted a population-based case-control study of incident type 2 diabetes cases in Denmark (population 5.6 million) between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2012. Data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, the Danish National Prescription Registry, and the Danish Person Registry were combined.

RESULTS:

The odds ratio (OR) associating type 2 diabetes with exposure to antibiotics of any type was 1.53 (95% confidence interval 1.50-1.55) with redemption of more than or equal to 5 versus 0-1 prescriptions. Although no individual group of antibiotics was specifically associated with type 2 diabetes risk, slightly higher ORs for type 2 diabetes were seen with narrow-spectrum and bactericidal antibiotics (OR 1.55 and 1.48) compared to broad-spectrum and bacteriostatic types of antibiotics (OR 1.31 and 1.39), respectively. A clear dose-response effect was seen with increasing cumulative load of antibiotics. The increased use of antibiotics in patients with type 2 diabetes was found up to 15 years before diagnosis of type 2 diabetes as well as after the diagnosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results could support the possibility that antibiotics exposure increases type 2 diabetes risk. However, the findings may also represent an increased demand for antibiotics from increased risk of infections in patients with yet-undiagnosed diabetes.

PMID:
26312581
PMCID:
PMC4596043
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2015-2696
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center