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Lasers Surg Med. 2015 Nov;47(9):698-703. doi: 10.1002/lsm.22405. Epub 2015 Aug 27.

Preliminary clinical investigation of cataract surgery with a noncontact femtosecond laser system.

Author information

1
The Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, China, 270 Xueyuan West Road, Wenzhou, 325000, Zhejiang, P.R. China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) is rapidly gaining popularity due to the improved consistency and predictability for capsulorhexis. This study aimed to investigate the preliminary clinical outcomes of FLACS with a noncontact femtosecond laser system.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

This prospective study enrolled 25 eyes in the trial group underwent FLACS (LLS-fs 3D, LENSAR, USA), and 29 eyes in the control group underwent conventional cataract surgery (Stellaris, Bausch & Lomb, USA). The phacoemulsification time, energy, and complications during operation were recorded. Postoperative refraction at 1 day, 1 week, 1 and 3 months, the capsulorhexis size and corneal endothelial density at 1 and 3 months were also measured.

RESULTS:

Compared to the control group, reduction in phacoemulsification time was 51.5% (P = 0.02), and in overall energy, 65.1% (P = 0.02) in the trial group. In the trial group and the control group, total time of cataract procedure was 10.04 ± 1.37 minutes, 10.52 ± 1.92 minutes, respectively (P = 0.31); the absolute difference between attempted and achieved capsulorhexis diameter at 1 month was 192.9 ± 212.0 µm, 626.9 ± 656.6 µm, respectively (P = 0.04), and at 3 months, 256.6 ± 181.9 µm, 572.1 ± 337.0 µm, respectively (P= 0.03); the absolute difference between attempted and achieved spherical equivalent at 3 months was 0.16 ± 0.16 D, 0.74 ± 0.65 D, respectively (P < 0.01); mean corneal endothelial cell loss at 1 month was 15.6% and 14.2%, respectively (P = 0.77), and at 3 months, 2.9%, 4.2%, respectively (P = 0.50).

CONCLUSIONS:

With the noncontact femtosecond laser system, FLACS can significantly improve the accuracy and repeatability of capsulorhexis, reduce the phacoemulsification time and overall energy, and enhance the predictability and stability of postoperative refraction.

KEYWORDS:

capsulorhexis; cataract surgery; femtosecond laser; phacoemulsification

PMID:
26311629
PMCID:
PMC5049591
DOI:
10.1002/lsm.22405
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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