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Am J Health Promot. 2016 Sep;30(7):498-500. doi: 10.4278/ajhp.131216-ARB-643. Epub 2016 Jun 16.

Promoting Influenza Vaccination to Restaurant Employees.

Author information

1
VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA.
2
Department of Health Services, University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle, Washington Health Promotion Research Center, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Research Center, Seattle, Washington jh7@uw.edu.
3
Department of Health Services, University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle, Washington Health Promotion Research Center, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
4
Immunization Services Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
5
Department of Health Services, University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle, Washington Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate an evidence-based workplace approach to increasing adult influenza vaccination levels applied in the restaurant setting

DESIGN:

We implemented an intervention and conducted a pre/post analysis to determine effect on vaccination.

SETTING:

Eleven Seattle-area restaurants.

SUBJECTS:

Restaurants with 25+ employees speaking English or Spanish and over 18 years.

INTERVENTION:

Restaurants received influenza vaccination promotion materials, assistance arranging on-site vaccination events, and free influenza vaccinations for employees.

MEASURES:

Pre/post employee surveys of vaccination status with direct observation and employer interviews to evaluate implementation.

ANALYSIS:

We conducted descriptive analysis of employee survey data and performed qualitative analysis of implementation data. To assess intervention effect, we used a mixed-effects logistic regression model with a restaurant-specific random effect.

RESULTS:

Vaccination levels increased from 26% to 46% (adjusted odds ratio 2.33, 95% confidence interval 1.69, 3.22), with 428 employees surveyed preintervention, 305 surveyed postintervention, and response rates of 73% and 55%, respectively. The intervention was effective across subgroups, but there were restaurant-level differences.

CONCLUSION:

An access-based workplace intervention can increase influenza vaccination levels in restaurant employees, but restaurant-level factors may influence success.

KEYWORDS:

Employee; Health focus: medical self care; Hispanic/Latino; Immunization; Influenza; Manuscript format: research; Outcome measure: behavioral; Prevention Research; Promotion; Research purpose: intervention testing; Setting: workplace; Strategy: behavior change; Study design: pre/post analysis; Target population age: adults; Target population circumstances: low-income; Vaccination; Workplace

PMID:
26305606
DOI:
10.4278/ajhp.131216-ARB-643
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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