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J Clin Oncol. 2015 Sep 20;33(27):3047-54. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2014.59.3632. Epub 2015 Aug 24.

Rare Tumors in Children: Progress Through Collaboration.

Author information

1
Alberto S. Pappo and Wayne L. Furman, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN; Kris A. Schultz, Children's Hospital of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; Andrea Ferrari, Instituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano, Italy; Lee Helman, National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research, Bethesda, MD; and Mark D. Krailo, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA. alberto.pappo@stjude.org.
2
Alberto S. Pappo and Wayne L. Furman, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN; Kris A. Schultz, Children's Hospital of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; Andrea Ferrari, Instituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano, Italy; Lee Helman, National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research, Bethesda, MD; and Mark D. Krailo, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA.

Abstract

Rare pediatric tumors account for approximately 10% of all childhood cancers, which in themselves are a rare entity. The diverse histologies and clinical behaviors of rare pediatric tumors pose challenges to the investigation of their biologic and clinical features. National and international cooperative groups such as the Rare Tumor Committee of the Children's Oncology Group, Rare Tumors in Pediatric Age Project, and European Cooperative Study Group for Pediatric Rare Tumors have developed several initiatives to advance knowledge about rare pediatric cancers. However, these programs have been only partially effective, necessitating the development of alternative mechanisms to study these challenging diseases. In this article, we review the current national and international collaborative strategies to study rare pediatric cancers and alternative methods under exploration to enhance those efforts, such as independent registries and disease-specific, National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinics.

PMID:
26304909
PMCID:
PMC4979197
DOI:
10.1200/JCO.2014.59.3632
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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