Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Clin Oncol. 2015 Sep 20;33(27):3065-73. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2014.60.6376. Epub 2015 Aug 24.

Toward the Cure of All Children With Cancer Through Collaborative Efforts: Pediatric Oncology As a Global Challenge.

Author information

1
Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo and Paola Friedrich, Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Patricia Alcasabas, Philippines General Hospital, Manila, Philippines; Federico Antillon, Unidad Nacional de Oncología Pediátrica, and Francisco Marroquín Medical School, Guatemala City, Guatemala; Shripad Banavali, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India; Luis Castillo, Hospital Pereira Rossell, Montevideo, Uruguay; Trijn Israels, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Sima Jeha and Ching-Hon Pui, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN; Mhammed Harif, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Mohammed VI, Marrakech, Morocco; Michael J. Sullivan, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; Thuan Chong Quah, National University Health System, Singapore; Catherine Patte, Institute Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif, France; Ronald Barr, McMaster University and McMaster Children's Hospital, Hamilton, ON, Canada; and Thomas Gross, National Cancer Institute Center for Global Health, Bethesda, MD. carlos_rodriguez-galindo@dfci.harvard.edu.
2
Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo and Paola Friedrich, Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Patricia Alcasabas, Philippines General Hospital, Manila, Philippines; Federico Antillon, Unidad Nacional de Oncología Pediátrica, and Francisco Marroquín Medical School, Guatemala City, Guatemala; Shripad Banavali, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India; Luis Castillo, Hospital Pereira Rossell, Montevideo, Uruguay; Trijn Israels, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Sima Jeha and Ching-Hon Pui, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN; Mhammed Harif, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Mohammed VI, Marrakech, Morocco; Michael J. Sullivan, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; Thuan Chong Quah, National University Health System, Singapore; Catherine Patte, Institute Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif, France; Ronald Barr, McMaster University and McMaster Children's Hospital, Hamilton, ON, Canada; and Thomas Gross, National Cancer Institute Center for Global Health, Bethesda, MD.

Abstract

Advances in the treatment of childhood cancers have resulted in part from the development of national and international collaborative initiatives that have defined biologic determinants and generated risk-adapted therapies that maximize cure while minimizing acute and long-term effects. Currently, more than 80% of children with cancer who are treated with modern multidisciplinary treatments in developed countries are cured; however, of the approximately 160,000 children and adolescents who are diagnosed with cancer every year worldwide, 80% live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where access to quality care is limited and chances of cure are low. In addition, the disease burden is not fully known because of the lack of population-based cancer registries in low-resource countries. Regional and ethnic variations in the incidence of the different childhood cancers suggest unique interactions between genetic and environmental factors that could provide opportunities for etiologic research. Regional collaborative initiatives have been developed in Central and South America and the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Oceania. These initiatives integrate regional capacity building, education of health care providers, implementation of intensity-graduated treatments, and establishment of research programs that are adjusted to local capacity and local needs. Together, the existing consortia and regional networks operating in LMICs have the potential to reach out to almost 60% of all children with cancer worldwide. In summary, childhood cancer burden has been shifted toward LMICs and, for that reason, global initiatives directed at pediatric cancer care and control are needed. Regional networks aiming to build capacity while incorporating research on epidemiology, health services, and outcomes should be supported.

PMID:
26304881
PMCID:
PMC4979198
DOI:
10.1200/JCO.2014.60.6376
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center