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Food Chem. 2016 Feb 1;192:1068-77. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.07.113. Epub 2015 Jul 23.

Evaluation of umami taste in mushroom extracts by chemical analysis, sensory evaluation, and an electronic tongue system.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, Anseong-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 456-756, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Food and Nutrition, Chung-Ang University, Anseong-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 456-756, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Food Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, Anseong-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 456-756, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: chanlee@cau.ac.kr.

Abstract

Seventeen edible mushrooms commercially available in Korea were analysed for their umami taste compounds (5'-nucleotides: AMP, GMP, IMP, UMP, XMP; free amino acids: aspartic, glutamic acid) and subjected to human sensory evaluation and electronic tongue measurements. Amanita virgineoides featured the highest total 5'-nucleotide content (36.9 ± 1.50 mg/g), while monosodium glutamate-like components (42.4 ± 6.90 mg/g) were highest in Agaricus bisporus. The equivalent umami concentration (EUC) ranged from 1.51 ± 0.42 to 3890 ± 833 mg MSG/g dry weight; most mushrooms exhibited a high umami taste. Pleurotus ostreatus scored the highest in the human sensory evaluation, while Flammulina velutipes obtained the maximum score in the electronic tongue measurement. The EUC and the sensory score from the electronic tongue test were highly correlated, and also showed significant correlation with the human sensory evaluation score. These results suggest that the electronic tongue is suitable to determine the characteristic umami taste of mushrooms.

KEYWORDS:

Electronic tongue; Equivalent umami concentration; Mushrooms; Sensory evaluation; Umami taste

PMID:
26304449
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.07.113
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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