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PLoS One. 2015 Aug 24;10(8):e0135433. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0135433. eCollection 2015.

Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Postgraduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil.
2
Physical Therapy Department, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
3
Santa Casa School of Medical Sciences, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma.

DESIGN:

A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function.

RESULTS:

No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG.

CONCLUSION:

The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvement in their exercise capacity and a reduction in pulmonary inflammation.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294.

PMID:
26301706
PMCID:
PMC4547724
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0135433
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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