Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuron. 2015 Sep 2;87(5):999-1007. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.07.030. Epub 2015 Aug 20.

Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: corey_harwell@hms.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA; Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
3
Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
4
Gladstone Institute for Neurological Disease, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
5
Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA; Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
6
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
7
Departments of Genetics and Ophthalmology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon, respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping, and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin.

PMID:
26299474
PMCID:
PMC4581718
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2015.07.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center