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Sleep Med. 2015 Sep;16(9):1056-61. doi: 10.1016/j.sleep.2015.03.022. Epub 2015 May 11.

Sleep-associated aspects of myofascial pain in the orofacial area among Temporomandibular Disorder patients and controls.

Author information

1
Department of Prosthodontics, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: Marc_Schmitter@med.uni-heidelberg.de.
2
Department of Prosthodontics, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Private Dental Practice Network Saarland, Grumbachtalweg 9, 66121 Saarbrücken, Saarland, Germany.
3
Private Dental Practice Network Saarland, Grumbachtalweg 9, 66121 Saarbrücken, Saarland, Germany.
4
Institute of Medical Biometry and Informatics, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
5
Department of Prosthodontics, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To assess sleep-associated aspects of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) with myofascial pain (MP) in the orofacial area of patients and controls.

MEASUREMENTS:

Three hundred five female patients were screened to find 44 participants fulfilling the inclusion criteria, 22 suffering from MP and 22 in a control group. Sleep quality was assessed by use of the Pittsburgh Sleep-Quality-Index (PSQI) and a validated German sleep questionnaire (SF-AR). Tooth wear was assessed and anterior temporalis muscle activity was measured at home for several nights by use of a portable electromyography (EMG) device.

RESULTS:

22 patients (45.0 ± 13.6 years) and 22 controls (45.2 ± 9.0 years) were recruited. The PSQI sum-score was 7.5 ± 3.7 for patients and 4.4 ± 3.0 for controls (p = 0.006). The SF-AR showed that 23% of the controls and 14% of the patients were "long sleepers". The overall number of episodes in the two groups was not significantly different (4.10 ± 2.65 versus 4.57 ± 1.99 episodes per hour). However, more patients had temporalis muscle activity possibly related to SB during all four consecutive nights (p = 0.04). According to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders - Third Edition (ICSD-3) criteria, 13.6% of the controls and 71.4% of the patients (p < 0.001) showed SB.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sleep-associated disturbances, including reduction of sleep quality and greater prevalence of SB and facial pain in the morning, occurred significantly more often among TMD patients. Additionally, SB fluctuated over the nights especially in controls. This should be taken into consideration when the prevalence of SB is assessed by use of EMG.

KEYWORDS:

Electromyography; Myofascial pain; Sleep bruxism; Sleep quality; Temporomandibular disorder

PMID:
26298779
DOI:
10.1016/j.sleep.2015.03.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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