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J Biophotonics. 2016 Mar;9(3):296-304. doi: 10.1002/jbio.201500167. Epub 2015 Aug 22.

Nano-assembly of nanodiamonds by conjugation to actin filaments.

Author information

1
ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia.
2
Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia.
3
Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia. louise.brown@mq.edu.au.

Abstract

Fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) are remarkable objects. They possess unique mechanical and optical properties combined with high surface areas and controllable surface reactivity. They are non-toxic and hence suited for use in biological environments. NDs are also readily available and commercially inexpensive. Here, the exceptional capability of controlling and tailoring their surface chemistry is demonstrated. Small, bright diamond nanocrystals (size ˜30 nm) are conjugated to protein filaments of actin (length ˜3-7 µm). The conjugation to actin filaments is extremely selective and highly target-specific. These unique features, together with the relative simplicity of the conjugation-targeting method, make functionalised nanodiamonds a powerful and versatile platform in biomedicine and quantum nanotechnologies. Applications ranging from using NDs as superior biological markers to, potentially, developing novel bottom-up approaches for the fabrication of hybrid quantum devices that would bridge across the bio/solid-state interface are presented and discussed.

KEYWORDS:

bioconjugation; fluorescent nanodiamond; hybrid quantum devices; self-assembly; specific binding

PMID:
26296437
DOI:
10.1002/jbio.201500167
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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