Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Postgrad Med J. 2015 Oct;91(1080):561-4. doi: 10.1136/postgradmedj-2015-133353. Epub 2015 Aug 20.

Thou shalt not tweet unprofessionally: an appreciative inquiry into the professional use of social media.

Author information

1
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
2
Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff, UK.
3
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
4
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Social media may blur the line between socialisation and professional use. Traditional views on medical professionalism focus on limiting motives and behaviours to avoid situations that may compromise care. It is not surprising that social media are perceived as a threat to professionalism.

OBJECTIVE:

To develop evidence for the professional use of social media in medicine.

METHODS:

A qualitative framework was used based on an appreciative inquiry approach to gather perceptions and experiences of 31 participants at the 2014 Social Media Summit.

RESULTS:

The main benefits of social media were the widening of networks, access to expertise from peers and other health professionals, the provision of emotional support and the ability to combat feelings of isolation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Appreciative inquiry is a tool that can develop the positive practices of organisations and individuals. Our results provide evidence for the professional use of social media that may contribute to guidelines to help individuals realise benefits and avoid harms.

KEYWORDS:

MEDICAL EDUCATION & TRAINING

PMID:
26294333
PMCID:
PMC4621375
DOI:
10.1136/postgradmedj-2015-133353
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center