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Med Health Care Philos. 2016 Jun;19(2):215-25. doi: 10.1007/s11019-015-9658-1.

The ethics of killing human/great-ape chimeras for their organs: a reply to Shaw et al.

Author information

1
Institute for Science Ethics and Innovation, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road M13 9PL Stopford Building, Room 3.383, Manchester, UK. Cesar.palaciosgonzalez@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk.

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to critically examine David Shaw, Wybo Dondorp, and Guido de Wert's arguments in favour of the procurement of human organs from human/nonhuman-primate chimeras, specifically from great-ape/human chimeras. My main claim is that their arguments fail and are in need of substantial revision. To prove this I first introduce the topic, and then reconstruct Shaw et al.'s position and arguments. Next, I show that Shaw et al.: (1) failed to properly apply the subsidiarity and proportionality principles; (2) neglected species overlapping cases in their ethical assessment; (3) ignored the ethics literature on borderline persons; and (4) misunderstood McMahan's two-tiered moral theory. These mistakes render an important part of their conclusions either false or problematic to the point that they would no longer endorse them. Finally I will briefly mention a possible multipolar solution to the human organ shortage problem that would reduce the need for chimeras' organs.

KEYWORDS:

Chimeras; Great ape; Human-nonhuman chimeras; Nonhuman animals; Organ donation; Part-human

PMID:
26294174
PMCID:
PMC4880624
DOI:
10.1007/s11019-015-9658-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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