Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Oral Investig. 2016 Apr;20(3):443-50. doi: 10.1007/s00784-015-1535-z. Epub 2015 Aug 22.

The effectiveness of dentifrices without and with sodium lauryl sulfate on plaque, gingivitis and gingival abrasion--a randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Clinic for Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology; School for Dental Medicine, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
2
Department of Periodontology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University, Gustav Mahlerlaan 3004, 1081 LA, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Sara Lee Corporation, Amersfoort, Netherlands.
4
Department of Periodontology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University, Gustav Mahlerlaan 3004, 1081 LA, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ga.vd.weijden@acta.nl.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a dentifrice without sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) to a dentifrice with SLS in young adults aged 18-34 years on gingivitis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

One hundred twenty participants (non-dental students) with a moderate gingival inflammation (bleeding on probing at 40-70 % of test sites) were included in this randomized controlled double blind clinical trial. According to randomization, participants had to brush their teeth either with dentifrice without SLS or with SLS for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was bleeding on marginal probing (BOMP). The secondary outcomes were plaque scores and gingival abrasion scores (GA) as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS) score at exit survey. Baseline and end differences were analysed by univariate analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) test, between group differences by independent t test and within groups by paired sample t test.

RESULTS:

BOMP improved within groups from on average 0.80 at baseline to 0.60 in the group without SLS and to 0.56 in the group with SLS. No statistical difference for BOMP, plaque and gingival abrasion was found between both groups. VAS scores for taste, freshness and foaming effect were significantly in favour of the SLS-containing dentifrice.

CONCLUSION:

The test dentifrice without SLS was as effective as a regular SLS dentifrice on gingival bleeding scores and plaque scores. There was no significant difference in the incidence of gingival abrasion.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

In patients diagnosed with gingivitis, a dentifrice without SLS seems to be equally effective compared to a dentifrice with SLS and did not demonstrate any significant difference in gingival abrasion. In patient with recurrent aphthous ulcers, the absence of SLS may even be beneficial. However, participants indicate that they appreciate the foaming effect of a dentifrice with SLS more.

KEYWORDS:

Dentifrice; Gingival abrasion; Gingivitis; Manual toothbrush; Plaque; SLS; Sodium lauryl sulfate; Toothpaste

PMID:
26293981
PMCID:
PMC4799265
DOI:
10.1007/s00784-015-1535-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center