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Transplant Proc. 2015 Jul-Aug;47(6):1926-32. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2015.02.025.

Rapid Detection of Bloodstream Pathogens in Liver Transplantation Patients With FilmArray Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays: Comparison With Conventional Methods.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Inonu University, Malatya, Turkey. Electronic address: baris.otlu@inonu.edu.tr.
2
Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Inonu University, Malatya, Turkey.
3
Department of Surgery, Liver Transplantation Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Inönü University, Malatya, Turkey.
4
Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Inonu University, Malatya, Turkey.
5
Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bloodstream infection (BSI) is an important concern in transplant patients. Early intervention with appropriate antimicrobial therapy is critical to better clinical outcome; however, there is significant delay when conventional identification methods are used.

METHODS:

We aimed to determine the diagnostic performance of the FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel, a recently approved multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay detecting 24 BSI pathogens and 3 resistance genes, in comparison with the performances of conventional identification methods in liver transplant (LT) patients. A total of 52 defined sepsis episodes (signal-positive by blood culture systems) from 45 LT patients were prospectively studied.

RESULTS:

The FilmArray successfully identified 37 of 39 (94.8%) bacterial and 3 of 3 (100%) yeast pathogens in a total of 42 samples with microbial growth, failing to detect only 2 of 39 (5.1%) bacterial pathogens that were not covered by the test panel. The FilmArray could also detect additional pathogens in 3 samples that had been reported as having monomicrobial growth, and it could detect Acinetobacter baumannii in 2 samples suspected of skin flora contamination. The remaining 8 blood cultures showing a positive signal but yielding no growth were also negative by this assay. Results of MecA, KPC, and VanA/B gene detection were in high accordance. The FilmArray produced results with significantly shorter turnaround times (1.33 versus 36.2, 23.6, and 19.5 h; P < .05) than standard identification methods, Vitek II, and Vitek MS, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study showed that the FilmArray appeared as a reliable alternative diagnostic method with the potential to mitigate problems with protracted diagnosis of the BSI pathogens in LT patients.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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