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Psychiatry Res. 2015 Oct 30;229(3):926-32. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.07.017. Epub 2015 Aug 1.

Population difference in the association of BDNF promoter methylation with mild cognitive impairment in the Xinjiang Uygur and Han populations.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine for Cadres, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Urumchi 830000, China.
2
Department of Internal Medicine for Cadres, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Urumchi 830000, China. Electronic address: zhouxiaohui858@sina.com.
3
Ningbo Key Lab of Behavior Neuroscience, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211, China.
4
Ningbo Key Lab of Behavior Neuroscience, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211, China. Electronic address: wangqinwen@nbu.edu.cn.
5
Ningbo Key Lab of Behavior Neuroscience, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211, China. Electronic address: duanshiwei@nbu.edu.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a clinical transitional stage between normal aging and Alzheimer disease, which leads to memory loss and a reduction in cognitive function. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in neuronal development and plasticity. The aim of this study was to explore the association between BDNF promoter methylation and MCI in the Xinjiang Uygur and Han populations.

METHODS:

A DNA methylation assay using bisulfite pyrosequencing technology was performed on 96 Uygur and 96 Han Chinese individuals from Xinjiang province, China.

RESULTS:

We found a significantly higher BDNF methylation level in Han MCI cases than in Uygur MCI cases in males from Xinjiang province (p=0.022). In addition, the methylation level was significantly higher in Xinjiang Han healthy Chinese individuals (Northwestern China) than in Ningbo Han healthy Chinese individuals (Southeastern China) (Female and Male: p=1.17E-05; Female: p=0.020; Male: p=1.37E-04). But our results showed no significant association of BDNF methylation with MCI in either the Uygur or Han Chinese populations (p>0.05). Further gender-based subgroup analyses did not find any significant results (p>0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Our results indicate that different levels of BDNF methylation may be present in different populations and environments. This study also provides further information regarding the relationship between BDNF methylation levels and MCI in Xinjiang Uygur and Han ethnic groups.

KEYWORDS:

BDNF; DNA methylation; Mild cognitive impairment; Population difference

PMID:
26292618
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2015.07.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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