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J Thorac Oncol. 2015 Sep;10(9):1243-1260. doi: 10.1097/JTO.0000000000000630.

The 2015 World Health Organization Classification of Lung Tumors: Impact of Genetic, Clinical and Radiologic Advances Since the 2004 Classification.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: travisw@mskcc.org.
2
Dept d'Anatomie et Cytologie Pathologiques, CHU Albert Michallon, University Joseph Fourier; INSERM U823 Institut Albert Bonniot, Grenoble, France.
3
Department of Pathology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
4
Department of Pathology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya, Japan.
5
Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York.
6
Department of Pathology, Ichan School of Medicine at Mt Sinai, New York, New York.
7
Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
8
Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
9
Sullivan Nicolaides Pathology, The John Flynn Hospital, Tugun, Queensland, Australia.
10
Department of Pathology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
11
Department of Pathology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi.
12
University of Colorado Cancer Center UCHSC, Aurora, Colorado.
13
Department of Pathology, The JFCR Cancer Institute, Tokyo, Japan.
14
Department of Pathology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom.
15
Department of Pathology; Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.
16
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy.
17
Division of Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Ichan School of Medicine at Mt Siai, New York, New York.
18
Department of Pathology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
19
Department of Pathology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.

Abstract

The 2015 World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Tumors of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart has just been published with numerous important changes from the 2004 WHO classification. The most significant changes in this edition involve (1) use of immunohistochemistry throughout the classification, (2) a new emphasis on genetic studies, in particular, integration of molecular testing to help personalize treatment strategies for advanced lung cancer patients, (3) a new classification for small biopsies and cytology similar to that proposed in the 2011 Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification, (4) a completely different approach to lung adenocarcinoma as proposed by the 2011 Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification, (5) restricting the diagnosis of large cell carcinoma only to resected tumors that lack any clear morphologic or immunohistochemical differentiation with reclassification of the remaining former large cell carcinoma subtypes into different categories, (6) reclassifying squamous cell carcinomas into keratinizing, nonkeratinizing, and basaloid subtypes with the nonkeratinizing tumors requiring immunohistochemistry proof of squamous differentiation, (7) grouping of neuroendocrine tumors together in one category, (8) adding NUT carcinoma, (9) changing the term sclerosing hemangioma to sclerosing pneumocytoma, (10) changing the name hamartoma to "pulmonary hamartoma," (11) creating a group of PEComatous tumors that include (a) lymphangioleiomyomatosis, (b) PEComa, benign (with clear cell tumor as a variant) and.

PMID:
26291008
DOI:
10.1097/JTO.0000000000000630
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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