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Diabetes Obes Metab. 2016 Feb;18(2):115-24. doi: 10.1111/dom.12556. Epub 2015 Oct 9.

Accessory cells for β-cell transplantation.

Author information

1
Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
2
Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
3
Department of Pediatrics and Genetics, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
4
Department Hematology Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
5
Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Center for Molecular and Vascular Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
6
Department of Endocrinology, UZ Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
7
Department of Endocrinology, ASZ Aalst, Aalst, Belgium.

Abstract

Despite recent advances, insulin therapy remains a treatment, not a cure, for diabetes mellitus with persistent risk of glycaemic alterations and life-threatening complications. Restoration of the endogenous β-cell mass through regeneration or transplantation offers an attractive alternative. Unfortunately, signals that drive β-cell regeneration remain enigmatic and β-cell replacement therapy still faces major hurdles that prevent its widespread application. Co-transplantation of accessory non-islet cells with islet cells has been shown to improve the outcome of experimental islet transplantation. This review will highlight current travails in β-cell therapy and focuses on the potential benefits of accessory cells for islet transplantation in diabetes.

KEYWORDS:

accessory cells; diabetes; pancreas; transplantation; β cell

PMID:
26289770
DOI:
10.1111/dom.12556
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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