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J Clin Sleep Med. 2015 Oct 15;11(10):1091-9. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.5078.

Physical Inactivity Is Associated with Moderate-Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

Author information

1
Centre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
2
Centre for Sleep Science, School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, Faculty Science, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
3
Western Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre II, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
4
Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia, Australia.
5
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
6
School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
7
Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
8
School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
9
The Joanna Briggs Institute and School for Translational Health Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
10
Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, Adelaide, Australia.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether low levels of physical activity were associated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), OSA-related symptoms, and cardiometabolic risk.

METHODS:

A case-control study design was used. OSA cases were patients referred to a sleep clinic for suspected OSA (n = 2,340). Controls comprised participants from the Busselton community (n = 1,931). Exercise and occupational activity were derived from questionnaire data. Associations were modelled using logistic and linear regression and adjusted for confounders.

RESULTS:

In comparison with moderate exercise, the high, low, and nil exercise groups had an odds ratio (OR) for moderate-severe OSA of 0.6 (95% CI 0.5-0.8), 1.6 (95% CI 1.2-2.0), and 2.7 (95% CI 1.9-3.7), respectively. Relative to men in heavy activity occupations, men in medium, light and sedentary occupations had an OR for moderate-severe OSA of 1.7 (95% CI 1.1-2.5), 2.1 (95% CI 1.4-3.2), and 1.8 (95% CI 1.2-2.8), respectively. Relative to women in medium activity occupations, women in light and sedentary occupations had an OR for moderate-severe OSA of 4.2 (95% CI 2.6-7.2) and 3.5 (2.0-6.0). OSA patients who adequately exercised had lower: levels of doctor-diagnosed depression (p = 0.047); symptoms of fatigue (p < 0.0001); systolic (p = 0.015) and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.015); and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

Low levels of physical activity were associated with moderate-severe OSA. Exercise in individuals with OSA is associated with lower levels of depression, fatigue, blood pressure and CRP.

KEYWORDS:

cardio metabolic; exercise; occupation; sleep disordered breathing; weight

PMID:
26285117
PMCID:
PMC4582050
DOI:
10.5664/jcsm.5078
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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