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Pediatrics. 2015 Sep;136(3):e554-62. doi: 10.1542/peds.2015-0825. Epub 2015 Aug 17.

Infection-Related Hospitalization in Childhood and Adult Metabolic Outcomes.

Author information

1
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Pediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Pediatrics, Monash University, Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Monash Children's Hospital, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; david.burgner@mcri.edu.au.
2
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Pediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia;
3
Research Center of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia;
4
Departments of Clinical Physiology and.
5
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Finlab Laboratories, Tampere University Hospital and University of Tampere School of Medicine, Tampere, Finland;
6
Pediatrics, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland;
7
Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland;
8
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland;
9
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, and Department of Pediatrics, Vaasa Central Hospital, Vaasa, Finland;
10
Department of Children and Adolescents, Oulu University Hospital, PEDEGO Research Group, and Medical Research Center Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland;
11
Oxford Martin School and Nuffield Department of Population Health, Oxford University; Oxford, United Kingdom;
12
Department of Medicine, University of Turku, and Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; and.
13
Research Center of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
14
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Medicine, University of Turku, and Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; and.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Identifying childhood determinants of adult cardiometabolic disease would facilitate early-life interventions. There are few longitudinal data on the contribution of childhood infections. Therefore, we investigated whether hospitalization with childhood infection is associated with adult anthropometric and metabolic outcomes in a large, well-phenotyped longitudinal cohort.

METHODS:

A total of 1376 subjects from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, aged 3 to 9 years at baseline (1980), who had lifetime data from birth onward on infection-related hospitalization (IRH) had repeated assessments through childhood and adolescence and at least once in adulthood (age 30-45 years in 2001-2011). Early childhood (<5 years), childhood/adolescence (5-18 years), adult (>18 years), and total lifetime IRHs were related to adiposity, BMI, and metabolic syndrome in adulthood. Analyses were adjusted for childhood and adulthood risk factors and potential confounders.

RESULTS:

Early-childhood IRH correlated with adverse adult but not childhood metabolic variables: increased BMI (P = .02) and metabolic syndrome (risk ratio: 1.56; 95% confidence interval: 1.03-2.35; P = .03), adjusted for age, gender, birth weight, childhood BMI and other risk factors, and family income. The age at which differences in adult BMI became persistent was related to age of IRH in childhood. The greatest increase in adult BMI occurred in those with >1 childhood IRH.

CONCLUSIONS:

Childhood IRH was independently associated with adverse adult metabolic variables. This finding suggests that infections and/or their treatment in childhood may contribute to causal pathways leading to adult cardiometabolic diseases.

PMID:
26283782
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2015-0825
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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