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J Clin Oncol. 2015 Oct 1;33(28):3169-76. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2015.61.1095. Epub 2015 Aug 17.

Results of the Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) Trial: A Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention in Overweight or Obese Breast Cancer Survivors.

Author information

1
Cheryl L. Rock, Shirley W. Flatt, Bilgé Pakiz, and Barbara A. Parker, University of California, San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla; Patricia A. Ganz, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; Tim E. Byers, Anthony Elias, Rebecca L. Sedjo, and Holly Wyatt, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO; Graham A. Colditz, Jingxia Liu, and Michael Naughton, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO; Wendy Demark-Wahnefried and Helen Krontiras, University of Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; and Kathleen Y. Wolin, Coeus Health, Scale Down, and Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. clrock@ucsd.edu.
2
Cheryl L. Rock, Shirley W. Flatt, Bilgé Pakiz, and Barbara A. Parker, University of California, San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla; Patricia A. Ganz, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; Tim E. Byers, Anthony Elias, Rebecca L. Sedjo, and Holly Wyatt, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO; Graham A. Colditz, Jingxia Liu, and Michael Naughton, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO; Wendy Demark-Wahnefried and Helen Krontiras, University of Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; and Kathleen Y. Wolin, Coeus Health, Scale Down, and Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Obesity increases risk for all-cause and breast cancer mortality and comorbidities in women who have been diagnosed and treated for breast cancer. The Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY) study is the largest weight loss intervention trial among survivors of breast cancer to date.

METHODS:

In this multicenter trial, 692 overweight/obese women who were, on average, 2 years since primary treatment for early-stage breast cancer were randomly assigned to either a group-based behavioral intervention, supplemented with telephone counseling and tailored newsletters, to support weight loss or a less intensive control intervention and observed for 2 years. Weight and blood pressure were measured at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Longitudinal mixed models were used to analyze change over time.

RESULTS:

At 12 months, mean weight loss was 6.0% of initial weight in the intervention group and 1.5% in the control group (P<.001). At 24 months, mean weight loss in the intervention and control groups was 3.7% and 1.3%, respectively (P<.001). Favorable effects of the intervention on physical activity and blood pressure were observed. The weight loss intervention was more effective among women older than 55 years than among younger women.

CONCLUSION:

A behavioral weight loss intervention can lead to clinically meaningful weight loss in overweight/obese survivors of breast cancer. These findings support the need to conduct additional studies to test methods that support sustained weight loss and to examine the potential benefit of intentional weight loss on breast cancer recurrence and survival.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01112839.

PMID:
26282657
PMCID:
PMC4582146
DOI:
10.1200/JCO.2015.61.1095
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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