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Life Sci. 2015 Oct 15;139:97-107. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2015.07.031. Epub 2015 Aug 15.

The potential physiological crosstalk and interrelationship between two sovereign endogenous amines, melatonin and homocysteine.

Author information

1
Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India.
2
Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India. Electronic address: anupomborahh@gmail.com.

Abstract

The antioxidant melatonin and the non-proteinogenic excitotoxic amino acid homocysteine (Hcy) are very distinct but related reciprocally to each other in their mode of action. The elevated Hcy level has been implicated in several disease pathologies ranging from cardio- and cerebro-vascular diseases to neurodegeneration owing largely to its free radical generating potency. Interestingly, melatonin administration potentially normalizes the elevated Hcy level, thereby protecting the cells from the undesired Hcy-induced excitotoxicity and cell death. However, the exact mechanism and between them remain obscure. Through literature survey we have found an indistinct but a vital link between melatonin and Hcy i.e., the existence of reciprocal regulation between them, and this aspect has been thoroughly described herein. In this review, we focus on all the possibilities of co-regulation of melatonin and Hcy at the level of their production and metabolism both in basal and in pathological conditions, and appraised the potential of melatonin in ameliorating homocysteinemia-induced cellular stresses. Also, we have summarized the differential mode of action of melatonin and Hcy on health and disease states.

KEYWORDS:

Antioxidant; Apoptosis; Co-regulation; Health and disease; Hyperhomocysteinemia; Inflammation; Oxidative stress

PMID:
26281918
DOI:
10.1016/j.lfs.2015.07.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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