Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatr Res. 2015 Sep;78(3):280-5. doi: 10.1038/pr.2015.98. Epub 2015 May 21.

Diagnostic screening for subclinical celiac disease using a rapid test in children aged 2-4.

Author information

1
Pediatrics Unit, Maracena Clinical Management Unit, Distrito Sanitario Metropolitano-Granada, Spain.
2
Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital, Granada, Spain.
3
Clinical Diagnostic Department, Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital, Granada, Spain.
4
Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada, Granada, Spain.
5
IMIBIC/Reina Sofía University Hospital/University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Our aim is to study the prevalence of subclinical celiac disease (CD) and analyze the diagnostic yield of a new rapid test in children aged 2-4.

METHODS:

We carried out a cross-sectional study in a sample population of children aged 2-4 from the same metropolitan area. We recruited apparently healthy subjects, and collected clinical, anthropometric, analytical, and serological variables. We also tested for anti-gliadin IgA and anti-transglutaminase IgG and IgA using a rapid immunochromatographic test CD1WB and CD2WB (Operon, Zaragoza, Spain).

RESULTS:

One hundred and ninety-eight children were recruited, signed the informed consent form, and completed the protocol (mean age 32.3 ± 9.2 mo, 53% males). CD prevalence according to the serological tests was 3% (CI 95%, 1.4-6.4%). Biopsies were used to confirm the diagnosis in all suspected cases. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of the CD2WB immunochromatographic test strip were 100% and 1, respectively. The sensitivity of CD1WB was 16.6% and its specificity was high (89.1%).

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence of subclinical CD in the sample group of 2-4-y old was higher than that found by other authors. The CD2WB immunochromatographic test strip is an excellent diagnostic screening tool with high sensitivity and negative predictive value.

PMID:
26280764
DOI:
10.1038/pr.2015.98
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center