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Dig Dis Sci. 2016 Jan;61(1):168-75. doi: 10.1007/s10620-015-3837-z. Epub 2015 Aug 18.

Gastric Electric Stimulation for Refractory Gastroparesis: A Prospective Analysis of 151 Patients at a Single Center.

Author information

1
Gastroenterology Section, Department of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Parkinson Pavilion, 8th Floor, 3401 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19140, USA.
2
Department of Surgery, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
3
Gastroenterology Section, Department of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Parkinson Pavilion, 8th Floor, 3401 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19140, USA. henry.parkman@temple.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Gastric electric stimulation (GES) is used to treat patients with refractory gastroparesis symptoms. However, the effectiveness of GES in clinical practice and the effect of GES on specific symptoms of gastroparesis are not well delineated.

AIMS:

To determine the effectiveness of GES for treatment for refractory symptoms of gastroparesis, the improvement in specific symptoms of gastroparesis, and clinical factors impacting on outcome.

METHODS:

Enterra GES was used to treat refractory gastroparesis symptoms. Patients filled out a symptom severity questionnaire (PAGI-SYM) prior to insertion. At each follow-up visit, the patient filled out PAGI-SYM and assessed their therapeutic response using the Clinical Patient Grading Assessment Scale (CPGAS).

RESULTS:

One hundred and fifty-one patients (120 females) with refractory gastroparesis (72 diabetic, 73 idiopathic, 6 other) underwent GES. Of the 138 with follow-up (1.4 ± 1.0 years), the average CPGAS was 2.4 ± 0.3 (SEM): 104 patients (75 %) improved (CPGAS > 0) and 34 (25 %) did not (CPGAS ≤ 0). Sixty patients (43 %) were at least moderately improved (CPGAS score ≥4). Clinical improvement was seen in both diabetic and idiopathic patients with the CPGAS in diabetic patients (3.5 ± 0.3) higher in idiopathic patients (1.5 ± 0.5; p < 0.05). Symptoms significantly improving the most included nausea, loss of appetite, and early satiety. Vomiting improved in both diabetic and idiopathic patients although the diabetic subgroup experienced a significantly greater reduction in vomiting than the idiopathic subgroup.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this cohort of patients with refractory gastroparesis, GES improved symptoms in 75 % of patients with 43 % being at least moderately improved. Response in diabetics was better than in nondiabetic patients. Nausea, loss of appetite, and early satiety responded the best.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes; Enterra; Gastroparesis; Idiopathic gastroparesis

PMID:
26280084
DOI:
10.1007/s10620-015-3837-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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