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Psychiatry Res. 2015 Oct 30;229(3):1038-42. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.02.022. Epub 2015 Mar 31.

Daytime intrusive thoughts and subjective insomnia symptoms.

Author information

1
Psychology, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK. Electronic address: louise.baker@soton.ac.uk.
2
Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK.
3
Psychology, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK; Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK. Electronic address: m.j.garner@soton.ac.uk.

Abstract

Insomnia is increasingly recognised as a 24h complaint that is associated with an increased risk of mood and anxiety disorders. However, the effects of insomnia symptoms on maladaptive daytime patterns of thinking are poorly understood. We examined the relationship between subjective insomnia symptoms, attentional control and negative thought intrusions during daytime in a large sample of undergraduates experiencing poor sleep. A total of 109 participants completed self-report measures of sleep quality, current sleepiness, anxiety and attentional control. A behavioural measure of intrusive thought required participants to control their attention during two focus periods separated by a 5min period of self-referential worry. Thought intrusions were sampled throughout the pre- and post-worry periods. Perceived insomnia severity was associated with the reduced ability to focus attention and uniquely associated with increased negative thought intrusions in the pre-worry period. These results support suggestions that acute episodes of poor sleep can dysregulate key networks involved in attentional control and emotion regulation, and that promote negative cognitive activity.

KEYWORDS:

Daytime dysfunction; Distractibility; Insomnia symptoms

PMID:
26279126
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2015.02.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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