Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Prev Med. 2015 Dec;81:58-62. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.08.001. Epub 2015 Aug 13.

The influence of housing characteristics on leisure-time sitting. A prospective cohort study in Danish adults.

Author information

1
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, the Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup University Hospital, Nordre Ringvej 57, Building 84-85, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark. Electronic address: madina.saidj@regionh.dk.
2
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, the Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark; Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Faculty of Medicine, University of Aalborg, Aalborg, Denmark.
3
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, the Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark.
4
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, the Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark; Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Experimental Research, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark.
5
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, the Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Built environmental attributes have been studied in relation to domestic time spent sedentary. An indoor behaviour has thus been linked to an outdoor setting. Yet, attributes of the actual domestic environment may also influence the time spent sedentary at home. Therefore, the aim was to examine if housing characteristics were cross-sectionally and prospectively related to leisure-time sitting in adults.

METHODS:

In the Danish Health2006 cohort, 2308 adults were followed for 5 years. At baseline, subjects self-reported housing characteristics (habitat type, habitat surface area and household size), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and socio-demographic factors. Leisure-time sitting was self-reported at baseline and 5-year follow-up. Multiple linear regression was used to assess cross-sectional and prospective associations.

RESULTS:

At baseline habitat surface area and household size were inversely associated with leisure-time sitting (p<0.01). Living in an apartment was associated with higher leisure-time sitting compared to living in a house (p<0.01). Household size was a predictor of 5-year leisure-time sitting (p<0.01), after adjustment for confounders and the other housing characteristics.

CONCLUSIONS:

Habitat type, habitat surface area and household size were associated with leisure-time sitting in adults, while especially household size was a predictor of leisure-time sitting five years later. The findings highlight the importance of home-environmental attributes when targeting a reduction in sedentary behaviours.

KEYWORDS:

Environment; Housing; Leisure-time; Sedentary lifestyle; Sitting

PMID:
26277633
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.08.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center