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Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2015 Oct;8(10):942-51. doi: 10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-15-0125. Epub 2015 Aug 14.

Double-Blind Randomized 12-Month Soy Intervention Had No Effects on Breast MRI Fibroglandular Tissue Density or Mammographic Density.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California. annawu@usc.edu.
2
Department of Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California.
3
Hematology Oncology, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, Louisiana.
4
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California.
5
Department of Radiology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California.
6
Department of Pathology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California.
7
MBreast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.
8
Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California.
9
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California. Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
10
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Abstract

Soy supplementation by patients with breast cancer remains controversial. No controlled intervention studies have investigated the effects of soy supplementation on mammographic density in patients with breast cancer. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study in previously treated patients with breast cancer (n = 66) and high-risk women (n = 29). We obtained digital mammograms and breast MRI scans at baseline and after 12 months of daily soy (50 mg isoflavones per day; n = 46) or placebo (n = 49) tablet supplementation. The total breast area (MA) and the area of mammographic density (MD) on the mammogram were measured using a validated computer-assisted method, and mammographic density percent (MD% = 100 × MD/MA) was determined. A well-tested computer algorithm was used to quantitatively measure the total breast volume (TBV) and fibroglandular tissue volume (FGV) on the breast MRI, and the FGV percent (FGV% = 100 × FGV/TBV) was calculated. On the basis of plasma soy isoflavone levels, compliance was excellent. Small decreases in MD% measured by the ratios of month 12 to baseline levels were seen in the soy (0.95) and the placebo (0.87) groups; these changes did not differ between the treatments (P = 0.38). Small decreases in FGV% were also found in both the soy (0.90) and the placebo (0.92) groups; these changes also did not differ between the treatments (P = 0.48). Results were comparable in patients with breast cancer and high-risk women. We found no evidence that soy supplementation would decrease mammographic density and that MRI might be more sensitive to changes in density than mammography.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01219075.

PMID:
26276750
PMCID:
PMC4596769
DOI:
10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-15-0125
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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