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Acta Trop. 2017 Jan;165:96-99. doi: 10.1016/j.actatropica.2015.08.006. Epub 2015 Aug 12.

Taenia solium in Europe: Still endemic?

Author information

1
Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. Electronic address: brechtdv@gmail.com.
2
Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal (CReSA), UAB-IRTA, Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain; Departament de Sanitat i Anatomia Animals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain.
3
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium.
4
Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal (CReSA), UAB-IRTA, Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain.
6
Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium; Institute of Health and Society (IRSS), Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
7
Veterinary Research Institute, Hellenic Agricultural Organisation-Demeter, Thessaloniki, Greece.
8
Geography and Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
9
Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium; Department of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium.

Abstract

The pork tapeworm, Taenia solium, causes an important economic and health burden, mainly in rural or marginalized communities of sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and Latin-America. Although improved pig rearing conditions seem to have eliminated the parasite in most Western European countries, little is known about the true endemicity status of T. solium throughout Europe. Three recent reviews indicate that autochthonous human T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis may be possible in Europe, but that current peer-reviewed literature is biased towards Western Europe. Officially reported data on porcine cysticercosis are highly insufficient. Favourable conditions for local T. solium transmission still exist in eastern parts of Europe, although the ongoing integration of the European Union is speeding up modernisation and intensification of the pig sector. Further evidence is urgently needed to fill the gaps on the European T. solium endemicity map. We urge to make human cysticercosis notifiable and to improve the reporting of porcine cysticercosis.

KEYWORDS:

Cysticercosis; Epidemiology; Europe; Neurocysticercosis; Taenia solium; Taeniasis

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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