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Brain Stimul. 2015 Nov-Dec;8(6):1010-20. doi: 10.1016/j.brs.2015.07.029. Epub 2015 Jul 17.

Measuring Brain Stimulation Induced Changes in Cortical Properties Using TMS-EEG.

Author information

1
Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Central Clinical School, The Alfred and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
2
Brain and Mental Health Laboratory, School of Psychological Sciences and Monash Biomedical Imaging, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
3
Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Central Clinical School, The Alfred and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: paul.fitzgerald@monash.edu.

Abstract

Neuromodulatory brain stimulation can induce plastic reorganization of cortical circuits that persist beyond the period of stimulation. Most of our current knowledge about the physiological properties has been derived from the motor cortex. The integration of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) is a valuable method for directly probing excitability, connectivity and oscillatory dynamics of regions throughout the brain. Offering in depth measurement of cortical reactivity, TMS-EEG allows the evaluation of TMS-evoked components that may act as a marker for cortical excitation and inhibition. A growing body of research is using concurrent TMS and EEG (TMS-EEG) to explore the effects of different neuromodulatory techniques such as repetitive TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation on cortical function, particularly in non-motor regions. In this review, we outline studies examining TMS-evoked potentials and oscillations before and after, or during a single session of brain stimulation. Investigating these studies will aid in our understanding of mechanisms involved in the modulation of excitability and inhibition by neuroplasticity following different stimulation paradigms.

KEYWORDS:

Cortical excitability; Electroencephalography (EEG); Neuromodulation; TMS-Evoked potential (TEP); Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

PMID:
26275346
DOI:
10.1016/j.brs.2015.07.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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