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J Child Neurol. 2016 Mar;31(4):461-7. doi: 10.1177/0883073815599260. Epub 2015 Aug 13.

Persistence of Cerebral Palsy Diagnosis: Assessment of a Low-Birth-Weight Cohort at Ages 2, 6, and 9 Years.

Author information

1
Perinatology Research Branch, NICHD/NIH/DHHS, Detroit, MI, USA Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA skorzeni@med.wayne.edu.
2
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.
3
Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
4
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA Department of Pediatrics and Human Development, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.

Abstract

We examined the stability of nondisabling and disabling cerebral palsy at age 2 in a longitudinally followed tri-county low-birth-weight (<2000 g) birth cohort. A total of 1105 newborns were enrolled, 901 (81.5%) survived to age 2, and 86% (n = 777) were followed up. Of the 113 cerebral palsy diagnoses at age 2, 61 (9% of the cohort, n = 61/777) had disabling cerebral palsy and 52 (7%, n = 52/777) had nondisabling cerebral palsy. Of 48 followed children diagnosed with disabling cerebral palsy at age 2, 98% were again classified as having cerebral palsy at school age, and 1 had an uncertain cerebral palsy status. By contrast, 41% (n = 17) of the 43 children diagnosed with nondisabling cerebral palsy at age 2 were classified as not having cerebral palsy. Of the 517 followed children who were not diagnosed with cerebral palsy at age 2, 7% (n = 35) were classified as having late emerging nondisabling cerebral palsy at school age.

KEYWORDS:

motor disorder improvement; transient cerebral palsy

PMID:
26271791
DOI:
10.1177/0883073815599260
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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