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J Neurovirol. 2016 Feb;22(1):80-7. doi: 10.1007/s13365-015-0370-y. Epub 2015 Aug 12.

Intrinsic network connectivity abnormalities in HIV-infected individuals over age 60.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA.
2
Memory and Aging Center, Sandler Neurosciences Center, Department of Neurology, University of California San Francisco, 675 Nelson Rising Lane, Suite 190, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA.
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA.
4
Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA.
5
Memory and Aging Center, Sandler Neurosciences Center, Department of Neurology, University of California San Francisco, 675 Nelson Rising Lane, Suite 190, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA. Vvalcour@memory.ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Individuals infected with HIV are living longer due to effective treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Despite these advances, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain prevalent. In this study, we analyzed resting state functional connectivity (rs-fc) data from HIV-infected and matched HIV-uninfected adults aged 60 years and older to determine associations between HIV status, neuropsychological performance, and clinical variables. HIV-infected participants with detectable plasma HIV RNA exhibited decreased rs-fc within the salience (SAL) network compared to HIV-infected participants with suppressed plasma HIV RNA. We did not identify differences in rs-fc within HIV-infected individuals by HAND status. Our analysis identifies focal deficits in the SAL network that may be mitigated with suppression of plasma virus. However, these findings suggest that rs-fc may not be sensitive as a marker of HAND among individuals with suppressed plasma viral loads.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; Functional MRI; HIV; Network connectivity

PMID:
26265137
PMCID:
PMC4732902
DOI:
10.1007/s13365-015-0370-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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