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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2015 Sep;109(3):466-75. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2015.07.008. Epub 2015 Jul 31.

Subjective sleep impairment in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes: Results from Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands.

Author information

1
Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic diseases (CoRPS), Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Tilburg University, PO Box 90153, Tilburg, 5000 LE, The Netherlands. Electronic address: g.m.nefs@tilburguniversity.edu.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, St. Elisabeth Hospital, PO Box 90151, Tilburg, 5000 LC, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Meibergdreef 47, Amsterdam, 1105 BA, The Netherlands; Departments of Integrative Neurophysiology and Medical Psychology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research (CNCR), Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University and Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1085, Amsterdam, 1081 HV, the Netherlands.
4
Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic diseases (CoRPS), Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Tilburg University, PO Box 90153, Tilburg, 5000 LE, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, A.J. Ernststraat 1187, Amsterdam, 1081 HL, The Netherlands.
5
The Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes, Diabetes Australia, Vic, 570 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne, Victoria, 3000, Australia; Centre for Mental Health and Wellbeing Research, School of Psychology, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria, 3125, Australia; AHP Research, 16 Walden Way, Hornchurch, UK.
6
Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic diseases (CoRPS), Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Tilburg University, PO Box 90153, Tilburg, 5000 LE, The Netherlands.

Abstract

AIMS:

Despite growing recognition of the impact of sleep on diabetes, a clear profile of people with diabetes regarding subjective sleep impairment has yet to be established. This study examines: (1) subjective sleep characteristics in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes; (2) the relationship of poor subjective sleep quality with glycaemic control, self-care and daytime functioning; (3) possible risk markers for poor sleep quality.

METHODS:

In a cross-sectional study, Dutch adults with type 1 (n=267) or type 2 diabetes (n=361) completed an online survey, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), socio-demographic, clinical, self-care and psychological measures.

RESULTS:

Poor sleep quality (PSQI-score >5) was reported by 31% of adults with type 1 and 42% of adults with type 2 diabetes. Participants with good and poor sleep quality did not differ in self-reported HbA1c or the frequency of meeting lifestyle recommendations. Poor sleep quality was related to a higher self-care burden and higher levels of daytime sleepiness, fatigue, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and diabetes-specific distress. In multivariable logistic regression analyses examining risk markers, poor sleep quality was associated with depressive symptoms in adults with type 1 (OR=1.39, 95% CI 1.25-1.54) and type 2 diabetes (OR=1.31, 1.16-1.47), and with being female in those with type 2 diabetes (OR=2.72, 1.42-5.20).

CONCLUSIONS:

Poor subjective sleep quality is prevalent both in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and is related to poor daytime functioning and higher self-care burden. The temporal relation with depression and merits of therapy should be explored.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes; Emotional distress; Fatigue; Glycaemic control; Self-care; Sleep quality

PMID:
26264411
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2015.07.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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