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Nutr Hosp. 2015 Jul 1;32(1):34-40. doi: 10.3305/nh.2015.32.1.9001.

NUTRITIONAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SPIRULINA (ARTHROSPIRA).

Author information

1
Laboratorio de Investigación Integral Cardiometabólica. Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación. Escuela Superior de Medicina, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F.. gabrielasalmean@yahoo.com.
2
Departamento de Farmacia. Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F. México.. lfabila@conacyt.mx.
3
Departamento de Farmacia. Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F. México.. gchamcev@yahoo.com.mx.

Abstract

in English, Spanish

Undernutrition constitutes a public health problem particularly in developing countries. The utilization of algae, particularly Spirulina, as a functional food was suggested decades ago due to the fact that it is not only a protein-dense food source, but because its amino acid profile is considered as of high biologic-value protein content. Spirulina provides essential fats (e.g., gamma-linolenic oleic acids), concomitant to low content nucleic acids. It also has an exceptionally high content of vitamin B12, is a good source of beta-carotene, iron, calcium and phosphorous. Moreover, Spirulina has also proven to have good acceptance as of its organoleptic properties (thus making it a possible prospect for food or a nutrition supplement) and it has not exhibited neither acute nor chronic toxicities, making it safe for human consumption.

PMID:
26262693
DOI:
10.3305/nh.2015.32.1.9001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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