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Pediatrics. 2015 Sep;136(3):458-65. doi: 10.1542/peds.2015-0792. Epub 2015 Aug 10.

Global Health Education in US Pediatric Residency Programs.

Author information

1
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin; sbutteris@pediatrics.wisc.edu.
2
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio;
3
University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington;
4
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin;
5
University of Rochester and Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York;
6
Center for Health Equity and Quality Research, University of Florida Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida;
7
University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont;
8
Department of Pediatrics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California;
9
University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona;
10
University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky;
11
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas;
12
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and.
13
Department of Pediatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Despite the growing importance of global health (GH) training for pediatric residents, few mechanisms have cataloged GH educational opportunities offered by US pediatric residency programs. We sought to characterize GH education opportunities across pediatric residency programs and identify program characteristics associated with key GH education elements.

METHODS:

Data on program and GH training characteristics were sought from program directors or their delegates of all US pediatric residency programs during 2013 to 2014. These data were used to compare programs with and without a GH track as well as across small, medium, and large programs. Program characteristics associated with the presence of key educational elements were identified by using bivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Data were collected from 198 of 199 active US pediatric residency programs (99.5%). Seven percent of pediatric trainees went abroad during 2013 to 2014. Forty-nine programs (24.7%) reported having a GH track, 66.1% had a faculty lead, 58.1% offered international field experiences, and 48.5% offered domestic field experiences. Forty-two percent of programs reported international partnerships across 153 countries. Larger programs, those with lead faculty, GH tracks, or partnerships had significantly increased odds of having each GH educational element, including pretravel preparation.

CONCLUSIONS:

The number of pediatric residency programs offering GH training opportunities continues to rise. However, smaller programs and those without tracks, lead faculty, or formal partnerships lag behind with organized GH curricula. As GH becomes an integral component of pediatric training, a heightened commitment is needed to ensure consistency of training experiences that encompass best practices in all programs.

PMID:
26260713
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2015-0792
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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