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Growth Horm IGF Res. 2016 Jun;28:76-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ghir.2015.08.002. Epub 2015 Aug 5.

Despite higher body fat content, Ecuadorian subjects with Laron syndrome have less insulin resistance and lower incidence of diabetes than their relatives.

Author information

1
Colegio de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador; Instituto de Endocrinología, Metabolismo y Reproducción - IEMYR, Quito, Ecuador. Electronic address: guevaraaguirre@yahoo.com.
2
Instituto de Endocrinología, Metabolismo y Reproducción - IEMYR, Quito, Ecuador.
3
Colegio de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador.

Abstract

In the present pandemics of obesity and insulin resistant diabetes mellitus (DM), the specific contribution of etiological factors such as shifts in nutritional and exercise patterns, genetic and hormonal, is subject of ongoing research. Among the hormonal factors implicated, we selected obesity-driven insulin resistance for further evaluation. It is known that growth hormone (GH) has profound effects on carbohydrate metabolism. In consequence, we compared the effects of the lack of the counter-regulatory effects of GH, in a group of subjects with GH receptor deficiency (GHRD) due to a mutated GH receptor vs. that of their normal relatives. It was found that, despite their obesity, subjects with GHRD, have diminished incidence of diabetes, lower glucose and insulin concentrations, and lower values of indexes indicative of insulin resistance such as HOMA-IR. The GHRD subjects were also capable of appropriately handling glucose or mixed meal loads despite diminished insulin secretion. These observations allow us to suggest that the association of obesity with increased risk for diabetes appears to be dependent on intact growth hormone signaling.

KEYWORDS:

Growth hormone; Growth hormone receptor; Growth hormone receptor deficiency; Laron syndrome

PMID:
26259979
DOI:
10.1016/j.ghir.2015.08.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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