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Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015 Sep;93(3 Suppl):16-27. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.15-0037. Epub 2015 Aug 10.

Biosignatures of Exposure/Transmission and Immunity.

Author information

1
Center for Global Health and Diseases and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California; Antigen Discovery Inc., Irvine, California; Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, London, United Kingdom; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California cxk21@case.edu ddavies@uci.edu.
2
Center for Global Health and Diseases and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California; Antigen Discovery Inc., Irvine, California; Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, London, United Kingdom; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Abstract

A blood test that captures cumulative exposure over time and assesses levels of naturally acquired immunity (NAI) would provide a critical tool to monitor the impact of interventions to reduce malaria transmission and broaden our understanding of how NAI develops around the world as a function of age and exposure. This article describes a collaborative effort in multiple International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMRs) to develop such tests using malaria-specific antibody responses as biosignatures of transmission and immunity. The focus is on the use of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax protein microarrays to identify a panel of the most informative antibody responses in diverse malaria-endemic settings representing an unparalleled spectrum of malaria transmission and malaria species mixes before and after interventions to reduce malaria transmission.

PMID:
26259938
PMCID:
PMC4574271
DOI:
10.4269/ajtmh.15-0037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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