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Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2015 Nov;21(11):1863-1869. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.07.032. Epub 2015 Aug 7.

Indications for Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Guidelines from the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Author information

1
Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.
2
Payer Policy, National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, MN.
3
Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.
4
Department of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.
5
Cigna LifeSource Transplant Network, Pittsburgh, PA.
6
Adult BMT Unit, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK.
7
Grand Island, NE.
8
Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.
9
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ.
10
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.
11
Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, Milwaukee, WI.
12
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.
13
Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, UK.
14
Malignant Hematology & Stem Cell Transplantation, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON.
15
Adult Bone Marrow Transplant Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY.
16
Sarah Cannon, Nashville, TN.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Approximately 20,000 hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) procedures are performed in the United States annually. With advances in transplantation technology and supportive care practices, HCT has become safer, and patient survival continues to improve over time. Indications for HCT continue to evolve as research refines the role for HCT in established indications and identifies emerging indications where HCT may be beneficial. The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) established a multiple-stakeholder task force consisting of transplant experts, payer representatives, and a patient advocate to provide guidance on "routine" indications for HCT. This white paper presents the recommendations from the task force. Indications for HCT were categorized as follows: (1) Standard of care, where indication for HCT is well defined and supported by evidence; (2) Standard of care, clinical evidence available, where large clinical trials and observational studies are not available but HCT has been shown to be effective therapy; (3) Standard of care, rare indication, for rare diseases where HCT has demonstrated effectiveness but large clinical trials and observational studies are not feasible; (4) Developmental, for diseases where preclinical and/or early phase clinical studies show HCT to be a promising treatment option; and (5) Not generally recommended, where available evidence does not support the routine use of HCT. The ASBMT will periodically review these guidelines and will update them as new evidence becomes available.

KEYWORDS:

Allogeneic transplantation; Autologous transplantation; Clinical trials; Hematopoietic cell transplantation; Indications; Routine care; Standard of care

PMID:
26256941
PMCID:
PMC4830270
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.07.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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