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Sci Rep. 2015 Aug 10;5:12891. doi: 10.1038/srep12891.

Population Landscape of Familial Cancer.

Author information

1
Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
2
1] Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden. [2] Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5705, USA.
3
Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Department of Pathology and Transplantation Laboratory and Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Finland.
4
1] Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120, Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden.

Abstract

Public perception and anxiety of familial cancer have increased demands for clinical counseling, which may be well equipped for gene testing but less prepared for counseling of the large domain of familial cancer with unknown genetic background. The aim of the present study was to highlight the full scope of familial cancer and the variable levels of risk that need to be considered. Data on the 25 most common cancers were obtained from the Swedish Family Cancer Database and a Poisson regression model was applied to estimate relative risks (RR) distinguishing between family histories of single or multiple affected first-degree relatives and their diagnostic ages. For all cancers, individual risks were significantly increased if a parent or a sibling had a concordant cancer. While the RRs were around 2.00 for most cancers, risks were up to 10-fold increased for some cancers. Familial risks were even higher when multiple relatives were affected. Although familial risks were highest at ages below 60 years, most familial cases were diagnosed at older ages. The results emphasized the value of a detailed family history as a readily available tool for individualized counseling and its preventive potential for a large domain of non-syndromatic familial cancers.

PMID:
26256549
PMCID:
PMC4530455
DOI:
10.1038/srep12891
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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