Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Pediatr Psychol. 2015 Nov-Dec;40(10):1115-23. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsv069. Epub 2015 Aug 5.

Children's Immediate Postoperative Distress and Mothers' and Fathers' Touch Behaviors.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and.
2
Department of Anesthesia, Dalhousie University.
3
Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, University of California, Irvine, and Yale Child Study Center, Yale University kate.rancourt@dal.ca.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examined mothers' and fathers' use of child-directed touch in the postanesthesia care unit.

METHODS:

In all, 142 mothers and 112 fathers of 143 children aged 2-11 years undergoing outpatient surgery participated. Parent touch (instrumental, empathic) and child distress were coded. Mothers' and fathers' rates of touch were compared, and interrelations between touch and child distress were examined (overall and sequentially).

RESULTS:

The proportion of mothers and fathers who used touch did not differ, but mothers' rates of touch were higher than fathers'. Parental instrumental touch and mothers embracing touch were positively correlated with children's distress. Mothers were more likely to use embracing touch in response to children's distress than at any other time.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results point to potential differences in mothers' and fathers' roles in the postoperative setting, and potentially different functions of touch. Results suggest that mothers may provide embracing touch to soothe or prevent children's distress.

KEYWORDS:

adjustment; children; fatherhood; motherhood; parenting; parents

PMID:
26251440
PMCID:
PMC4723680
DOI:
10.1093/jpepsy/jsv069
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center