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Surg Radiol Anat. 2016 Jan;38(1):97-106. doi: 10.1007/s00276-015-1526-4. Epub 2015 Aug 7.

Reference data on muscle volumes of healthy human pelvis and lower extremity muscles: an in vivo magnetic resonance imaging feasibility study.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Anatomy, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 13, 04103, Leipzig, Germany.
2
Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria.
3
Department Human Locomotion, Institute of Sport Science, Chemnitz University of Technology, Chemnitz, Germany.
4
Department of Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
5
School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Anatomy, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 13, 04103, Leipzig, Germany. nlshammer@googlemail.com.
7
School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan. nlshammer@googlemail.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Muscle volumes are of crucial interest when attempting to analyze individual physical performance and disease- or age-related alterations in muscle morphology. However, very little reference data are available in the literature on pelvis and lower extremity muscle volumes originating from healthy and young individuals. Furthermore, it is of interest if representative muscle volumes, covering large anatomical regions, can be obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a setting similar to the clinical routine. Our objective was therefore to provide encompassing, bilateral, 3-T MRI-based datasets on muscle volumes of the pelvis and the lower limb muscles.

METHODS:

T1-weighted 3-T MRI records were obtained bilaterally from six young and healthy participants. Three-dimensional volumes were compiled from 28 muscles and muscle groups of each participant before the muscle volumes were computed.

RESULTS:

Muscle volumes were obtained from 28 muscles and muscle groups of the pelvis and lower extremity. Volumes were larger in male than in female participants. Volumes of the dominant and non-dominant sides were similar in both genders. The obtained results were in line with volumetric data obtained from smaller anatomical areas, thus extending the available datasets.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides an encompassing and feasible approach to obtain data on the muscle volumes of pelvic and limb muscles of healthy, young, and physically active individuals. The respective data form a basis to determine effects of therapeutic approaches, progression of diseases, or technical applications like automated segmentation algorithms applied to different populations.

KEYWORDS:

Healthy young individuals; Magnetic resonance imaging; Pelvis and lower limb muscle volume

PMID:
26251021
DOI:
10.1007/s00276-015-1526-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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