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Diabet Med. 2016 Aug;33(8):1125-32. doi: 10.1111/dme.12878. Epub 2015 Sep 7.

Hypoglycaemia in adults with insulin-treated diabetes in the UK: self-reported frequency and effects.

Author information

1
The Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
2
Novo Nordisk Scandinavia AB, Copenhagen, Denmark.
3
Novo Nordisk Limited, Gatwick, UK.

Abstract

AIM:

Few real-life studies of non-severe (self-treated) hypoglycaemic events are available. This survey quantified the self-reported frequency of non-severe hypoglycaemia and its effects in adults with insulin-treated diabetes in the UK.

METHODS:

Adults aged > 15 years with Type 1 diabetes or insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes completed ≤ 4 weekly questionnaires (7-day recall). Respondents with Type 2 diabetes were grouped by insulin regimen: basal-only, basal-bolus and 'other'.

RESULTS:

Overall, 1038 respondents (466 with Type 1 diabetes, 572 with Type 2 diabetes) completed 3528 questionnaires. Mean numbers of non-severe events per week were 2.4 (Type 1 diabetes; median = 2) and 0.8 (Type 2 diabetes; median = 0); 23% and 26% of non-severe events occurred at night, respectively. Fatigue and reduced alertness were the commonest issues following events (78% and 51% of respondents, respectively). The effects of nocturnal events persisted longer than those of daytime events: Type 1 diabetes = 10.6 vs. 4.9 h (P = 0.0002); Type 2 diabetes = 15.3 vs. 5.1 h (P < 0.0001). In the week following an event, respondents' blood glucose measurements increased by 4.3 (Type 1 diabetes; 12% increment) and 4.2 (Type 2 diabetes; 21% increment) tests/week. In employed respondents, 20% of events caused work-time loss, more so following nocturnal (vs. daytime) hypoglycaemia: Type 1 diabetes = 2.7 vs. 1.1 h (P = 0.0184); Type 2 diabetes = 2.5 vs. 1.6 h (P = 0.1340). Most respondents rarely/never informed healthcare professionals about events (Type 1 diabetes = 82%, Type 2 diabetes = 69%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Non-severe hypoglycaemia is common in adults with insulin-treated diabetes in the UK, with consequent health-related/economic effects. Communication about non-severe hypoglycaemia is limited and the burden of hypoglycaemia may be underestimated.

PMID:
26248501
PMCID:
PMC5054881
DOI:
10.1111/dme.12878
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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