Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2015 Oct;59(10):6629-33. doi: 10.1128/AAC.00842-15. Epub 2015 Jul 27.

Fluconazole and Voriconazole Resistance in Candida parapsilosis Is Conferred by Gain-of-Function Mutations in MRR1 Transcription Factor Gene.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
2
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto, Porto, Portugal Center for Health Technology and Services Research (CINTESIS), Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
3
Institute for Biomedicine (iBiMED) and IEETA, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology of the University of Porto (IPATIMUP), Porto, Portugal.
4
UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland.
5
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto, Porto, Portugal Center for Health Technology and Services Research (CINTESIS), Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto, Porto, Portugal imiranda@med.up.pt.

Abstract

Candida parapsilosis is the second most prevalent fungal agent causing bloodstream infections. Nevertheless, there is little information about the molecular mechanisms underlying azole resistance in this species. Mutations (G1747A, A2619C, and A3191C) in the MRR1 transcription factor gene were identified in fluconazole- and voriconazole-resistant strains. Independent expression of MRR1 genes harboring these mutations showed that G1747A (G583R) and A2619C (K873N) are gain-of-function mutations responsible for azole resistance, the first described in C. parapsilosis.

PMID:
26248365
PMCID:
PMC4576118
DOI:
10.1128/AAC.00842-15
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center