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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2015 Dec 1;192(11):1335-44. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201501-0128OC.

Multicenter Comparison of Lung and Oral Microbiomes of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected Individuals.

Author information

1
1 Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado.
2
2 Veterans Affairs Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver, Colorado.
3
3 Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
4
4 Department of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana.
5
5 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia.
6
6 Department of Microbiology and.
7
7 Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
8
8 Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
9
9 Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
10
10 Department of Computational and Systems Biology and.
11
11 Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California; and.
12
12 Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
13
13 The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Improved understanding of the lung microbiome in HIV-infected individuals could lead to better strategies for diagnosis, therapy, and prophylaxis of HIV-associated pneumonias. Differences in the oral and lung microbiomes in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals are not well defined. Whether highly active antiretroviral therapy influences these microbiomes is unclear.

OBJECTIVES:

We determined whether oral and lung microbiomes differed in clinically healthy groups of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected subjects.

METHODS:

Participating sites in the Lung HIV Microbiome Project contributed bacterial 16S rRNA sequencing data from oral washes and bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs) obtained from HIV-uninfected individuals (n = 86), HIV-infected individuals who were treatment naive (n = 18), and HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (n = 38).

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Microbial populations differed in the oral washes among the subject groups (Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Rothia, and Atopobium), but there were no individual taxa that differed among the BALs. Comparison of oral washes and BALs demonstrated similar patterns from HIV-uninfected individuals and HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy, with multiple taxa differing in abundance. The pattern observed from HIV-infected individuals who were treatment naive differed from the other two groups, with differences limited to Veillonella, Rothia, and Granulicatella. CD4 cell counts did not influence the oral or BAL microbiome in these relatively healthy, HIV-infected subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

The overall similarity of the microbiomes in participants with and without HIV infection was unexpected, because HIV-infected individuals with relatively preserved CD4 cell counts are at higher risk for lower respiratory tract infections, indicating impaired local immune function.

KEYWORDS:

HIV infection; bronchoalveolar lavage; bronchoscopy; lung; microbiome

PMID:
26247840
PMCID:
PMC4731698
DOI:
10.1164/rccm.201501-0128OC
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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