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Nat Commun. 2015 Aug 6;6:7808. doi: 10.1038/ncomms8808.

Region-specific variation in the properties of skeletal adipocytes reveals regulated and constitutive marrow adipose tissues.

Author information

1
Departments of Molecular and Integrative Physiology and Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA.
2
Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Scarborough, Maine 04074, USA.
3
Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA.
4
Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.
5
Neuroendocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.
6
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.

Abstract

Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) accumulates in diverse clinical conditions but remains poorly understood. Here we show region-specific variation in MAT adipocyte development, regulation, size, lipid composition, gene expression and genetic determinants. Early MAT formation in mice is conserved, whereas later development is strain dependent. Proximal, but not distal tibial, MAT is lost with 21-day cold exposure. Rat MAT adipocytes from distal sites have an increased proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids and expression of Scd1/Scd2, Cebpa and Cebpb. Humans also have increased distal marrow fat unsaturation. We define proximal 'regulated' MAT (rMAT) as single adipocytes interspersed with active haematopoiesis, whereas distal 'constitutive' MAT (cMAT) has low haematopoiesis, contains larger adipocytes, develops earlier and remains preserved upon systemic challenges. Loss of rMAT occurs in mice with congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4, whereas both rMAT and cMAT are preserved in mice with congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 3. Consideration of these MAT subpopulations may be important for future studies linking MAT to bone biology, haematopoiesis and whole-body metabolism.

PMID:
26245716
PMCID:
PMC4530473
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms8808
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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