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Cell Metab. 2015 Aug 4;22(2):228-38. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2015.07.009.

Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Vertical Banded Gastroplasty Induce Long-Term Changes on the Human Gut Microbiome Contributing to Fat Mass Regulation.

Author information

1
The Wallenberg Laboratory and Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, SE-413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden.
2
Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
3
Department of Gastrosurgical Research and Education, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Sahlgrenska, SE-413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden.
4
Department of Gastrosurgical Research and Education, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Sahlgrenska, SE-413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden; Diabetes Complications Research Centre, UCD Conway Institute, School of Medicine and Medical Sciences, University College Dublin, Ireland.
5
The Wallenberg Laboratory and Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, SE-413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden; Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Section for Metabolic Receptology and Enteroendocrinology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DK-2200, Denmark. Electronic address: Fredrik.Backhed@wlab.gu.se.

Abstract

Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective procedure for the treatment of obesity. Given the role of the gut microbiota in regulating host metabolism and adiposity, we investigated the long-term effects of bariatric surgery on the microbiome of patients randomized to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or vertical banded gastroplasty and matched for weight and fat mass loss. The two surgical procedures induced similar and durable changes on the gut microbiome that were not dependent on body mass index and resulted in altered levels of fecal and circulating metabolites compared with obese controls. By colonizing germ-free mice with stools from the patients, we demonstrated that the surgically altered microbiota promoted reduced fat deposition in recipient mice. These mice also had a lower respiratory quotient, indicating decreased utilization of carbohydrates as fuel. Our results suggest that the gut microbiota may play a direct role in the reduction of adiposity observed after bariatric surgery.

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PMID:
26244932
PMCID:
PMC4537510
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2015.07.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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