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Kidney Int. 2015 Dec;88(6):1365-1373. doi: 10.1038/ki.2015.226. Epub 2015 Aug 5.

Association of prescribed Chinese herbal medicine use with risk of end-stage renal disease in patients with chronic kidney disease.

Lin MY1,2,3, Chiu YW1,2, Chang JS2,4, Lin HL5, Lee CT6, Chiu GF7, Kuo MC1,2, Wu MT6, Chen HC1,2, Hwang SJ1,2,8.

Author information

1
Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
2
Faculty of Renal Care, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
3
Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu, Taiwan.
4
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
5
Department of Chinese Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
6
Department of Public Health, College of Health Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
7
Department of Medical Informatics, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
8
Institute of Population Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan.

Abstract

The evidence on whether Chinese herbal medicines affect outcome in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is limited. Here we retrospectively explored the association of prescribed Chinese herbal medicine use and the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with CKD. Patients with newly diagnosed CKD in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from 2000 to 2005 were categorized into new use or nonuse of prescribed Chinese herbal medicine groups. These patients were followed until death, dialysis initiation, or till the end of 2008. Among the 24,971 study patients, 11,351 were new users of prescribed Chinese herbal medicine after CKD diagnosis. Overall, after adjustment for confounding variables, the use group exhibited a significant 60% reduced ESRD risk (cause-specific hazard ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.37-0.46) compared with the nonuse group. The change was significantly large among patients using wind dampness-dispelling formulas (0.63, 0.51-0.77) or harmonizing formulas (0.59, 0.46-0.74), suggesting an independent association between specific Chinese herbal medicines and reduced ESRD risk. The findings were confirmed using propensity score matching, stratified analyses, and three weighting methods. However, dampness-dispelling and purgative formulas were associated with increased ESRD risk. Thus, specific Chinese herbal medicines are associated with reduced or enhanced ESRD risk in patients with CKD.

PMID:
26244923
DOI:
10.1038/ki.2015.226

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