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Physiol Rep. 2015 Aug;3(8). pii: e12475. doi: 10.14814/phy2.12475.

Elevated hepcidin serum level in response to inflammatory and iron signals in exercising athletes is independent of moderate supplementation with vitamin C and E.

Author information

1
Institute of Veterinary Physiology, Vetsuisse Faculty, and Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
2
Department of Health and Human Performance, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
3
Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Immunology, Molecular Medicine Partnership Unit, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Institute of Nutritional and Food Sciences. Nutritional Physiology, Rheinische Friedrich Wilhelms Universität, Bonn, Germany.
5
Department of Physical Education, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
6
Institute of Veterinary Physiology, Vetsuisse Faculty, and Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia (UPCH), Lima, Peru maxg@access.uzh.ch.

Abstract

Iron deficiency among endurance athletes is of major concern for coaches, physicians, and nutritionists. Recently, it has been observed that hepcidin, the master regulator of iron metabolism, was upregulated after exercise and was found to be related to interleukin-6 (IL-6) elevation. In this study performed on noniron deficient and well-trained runners, we observed that hepcidin concentrations remain elevated in response to inflammatory and iron signals despite a 28-days supplementation period with vitamins C (500 mg/day) and E (400 IU/day).

KEYWORDS:

Endurance; interleukin‐6; iron deficiency; performance; vitamins

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