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BMC Pediatr. 2015 Aug 5;15:92. doi: 10.1186/s12887-015-0412-x.

Parent/caregiver health literacy among children with special health care needs: a systematic review of the literature.

Author information

1
University of Virginia School of Nursing, P.O. Box 800782, Charlottesville, 22908, VA, USA. jlk2t@virginia.edu.
2
University of Virginia School of Nursing, P.O. Box 800782, Charlottesville, 22908, VA, USA. LMC8C@hscmail.mcc.virginia.edu.
3
University of Virginia Children's Hospital, Charlottesville, VA, USA. LMC8C@hscmail.mcc.virginia.edu.
4
University of Virginia School of Nursing, P.O. Box 800782, Charlottesville, 22908, VA, USA. cmk4k@virginia.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) are children with medical or behavioral diagnoses that require services beyond those generally needed by pediatric populations. They account for a significant portion of pediatric health care expenditures and often have complicated treatment regiments. Health literacy has recently been recognized as a key indicator of quality chronic disease self-management and parental/caregiver health literacy of CSHCN is an understudied area. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the available evidence of studies investigating parent/caregiver health literacy of CSHCN.

METHODS:

Databases were searched to retrieve relevant articles for inclusion (dating from 1998 to 2014). Only studies that assessed the relationship between parent/caregiver health literacy on outcomes pertinent to CSHCN were included. Because of the limited number of studies, there were no restrictions placed on type of outcome.

RESULTS:

Thirteen studies were included in the final review with a range of health literacy assessments and outcome ascertainment. The majority of studies; (1) focused on the relationship between parental/caregiver health literacy and asthma outcomes, (2) were cross-sectional study designs, and (3) included samples recruited from pediatric clinics in academic medical settings.

CONCLUSIONS:

There were several gaps in the literature where future research is needed including; (1) direct assessment of child/adolescent health literacy, (2) inclusion of children with co-morbid conditions, (3) further assessment of the relationship between health literacy and health care utilization and cost, and (4) assessment of parental/caregiver health literacy in the inpatient care setting.

PMID:
26242306
PMCID:
PMC4525748
DOI:
10.1186/s12887-015-0412-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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