Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Cancer. 2015 Sep 1;113(5):848-60. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2015.265. Epub 2015 Aug 4.

Is England closing the international gap in cancer survival?

Author information

1
Cancer Survival Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK.
2
Department of Gynaecological Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London SW3 6JJ, UK.
3
Glenfield Hospital, University Hospitals of Leicester, Groby Road, Leicester LE3 9QP, UK.
4
Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevaal, PO Box 4956, Nydalen, NO-0424 Oslo, Norway.
5
K. G. Jebsen Colorectal Cancer Research Centre, Oslo University Hospital, PO Box 4953, Nydalen, NO-0424 Oslo, Norway.
6
Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
7
Department of Oncology, Gävle Hospital, SE-801 87 Gävle, Sweden.
8
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We provide an up-to-date international comparison of cancer survival, assessing whether England is 'closing the gap' compared with other high-income countries.

METHODS:

Net survival was estimated using national, population-based, cancer registrations for 1.9 million patients diagnosed with a cancer of the stomach, colon, rectum, lung, breast (women) or ovary in England during 1995-2012. Trends during 1995-2009 were compared with estimates for Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Clinicians were interviewed to help interpret trends.

RESULTS:

Survival from all cancers remained lower in England than in Australia, Canada, Norway and Sweden by 2005-2009. For some cancers, survival improved more in England than in other countries between 1995-1999 and 2005-2009; for example, 1-year survival from stomach, rectal, lung, breast and ovarian cancers improved more than in Australia and Canada. There has been acceleration in lung cancer survival improvement in England recently, with average annual improvement in 1-year survival rising to 2% during 2010-2012. Survival improved more in Denmark than in England for rectal and lung cancers between 1995-1999 and 2005-2009.

CONCLUSIONS:

Survival has increased in England since the mid-1990s in the context of strategic reform in cancer control, however, survival remains lower than in comparable developed countries and continued investment is needed to close the international survival gap.

PMID:
26241817
PMCID:
PMC4559829
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2015.265
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center