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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Aug 18;112(33):10321-4. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1504019112. Epub 2015 Aug 3.

Countering antivaccination attitudes.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61802; horne2@illinois.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095.
3
Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61802;

Abstract

Three times as many cases of measles were reported in the United States in 2014 as in 2013. The reemergence of measles has been linked to a dangerous trend: parents refusing vaccinations for their children. Efforts have been made to counter people's antivaccination attitudes by providing scientific evidence refuting vaccination myths, but these interventions have proven ineffective. This study shows that highlighting factual information about the dangers of communicable diseases can positively impact people's attitudes to vaccination. This method outperformed alternative interventions aimed at undercutting vaccination myths.

KEYWORDS:

attitude change; belief revision; science education; vaccination

PMID:
26240325
PMCID:
PMC4547299
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1504019112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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