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Surg Radiol Anat. 2016 Jan;38(1):71-8. doi: 10.1007/s00276-015-1509-5. Epub 2015 Aug 4.

Morphological concordance between CBCT and MDCT: a paranasal sinus-imaging anatomical study.

Author information

1
Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toulouse, CHU Rangueil-Larrey, Toulouse, France.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, Pierre-Paul Riquet Hospital, Toulouse University, Toulouse, France.
3
Department of Anatomy, University of Toulouse, CHU Rangueil-Larrey, Toulouse, France.
4
Department of Neuro-radiology, Pasteur Clinic, Toulouse, France.
5
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Toulouse, CHU Rangueil-Larrey, Toulouse, France.
6
Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toulouse, CHU Rangueil-Larrey, Toulouse, France. guidb31@yahoo.fr.
7
Department of Anatomy, University of Toulouse, CHU Rangueil-Larrey, Toulouse, France. guidb31@yahoo.fr.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging technique, first developed for use during oral and pre-implant surgery. In sinonasal surgery, CBCT might represent a valuable tool for anatomical research given its high spatial resolution and low irradiation dose. However, clinical and anatomical evidence pertaining to its efficacy is lacking. This study assessed the morphological concordance between CBCT and multislice detector computed tomography (MDCT) in the context of sinonasal anatomy.

METHODS:

We performed an anatomical study using 15 fresh cadaver heads. Each head underwent both CBCT and MDCT. Two independent reviewers evaluated 26 notable anatomical landmarks. The primary outcome was the overall morphological concordance between the two imaging techniques. Secondary objectives included assessment of inter-rater agreement and comparison of the radiation doses received by different parts of the anatomy.

RESULTS:

Overall morphological concordance between the two imaging techniques was excellent (>98 %); the inter-rater agreement for CBCT was approximately 97 %, which is highly similar to MDCT, but achieved using a significantly decreased irradiation dose.

CONCLUSION:

Our preliminary study indicates that CBCT represents a valid, reproducible, and safe technique for the identification of relevant sinonasal anatomical structures. Further research, particularly in pathological contexts, is required.

KEYWORDS:

Cone-beam computed tomography; Inter-rater agreement; Morphological concordance; Sinus imaging

PMID:
26239897
DOI:
10.1007/s00276-015-1509-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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